Death – South Africa’s anti-apartheid icon Desmond Tutu dies | News

Death – Obituary

Desmond Tutu, 90, was Nobel Peace Prize laureate and veteran of South Africa’s struggle against white minority rule.

Desmond Tutu, South Africa’s retired archbishop and anti-apartheid icon, has died aged 90.

Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and veteran of South Africa’s struggle against white minority rule, died on Sunday.

“The passing of Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu is another chapter of bereavement in our nation’s farewell to a generation of outstanding South Africans who have bequeathed us a liberated South Africa,” President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday.

He “distinguished himself as a non-sectarian, inclusive champion of universal human rights”, Ramaphosa added.

The presidency gave no details on the cause of death.

Tutu was diagnosed with prostate cancer in the late 1990s and, in recent years, was hospitalised on several occasions to treat infections associated with his treatment.

“Ultimately, at the age of 90, he died peacefully at the Oasis Frail Care Centre in Cape Town this morning,” Dr Ramphela Mamphele, acting chairperson of the Archbishop Desmond Tutu IP Trust and Co-ordinator of the Office of the Archbishop, said in a statement on behalf of the Tutu family.

Moral conscience

Tutu is often hailed as South Africa’s moral conscience and the great reconciler of a nation divided by decades of racist politics.

In 1984, he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his non-violent opposition to apartheid.

A decade later, he witnessed the end of that regime and he chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up to unearth atrocities committed during the segregation period.

Tutu led numerous marches and campaigns to end apartheid from St George’s front steps, and as a result it became known as the “People’s Cathedral” and a powerful symbol of democracy, according to the local government.

Tutu was a longtime friend of Nelson Mandela and lived for a time on the same street in the South African township of Soweto, Vilakazi Street, the only one in the world to host two Nobel Peace Prize winners.

Al Jazeera’s Fahmida Miller, reporting from Johannesburg, said the news had been “devastating” for many South Africans.

“This is a personality who had a huge role in the fight against apartheid,” she said.

“He always tried to unite South Africa, especially during times of tensions and difficulty in the country.”

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What Is An Obituary

In national newspapers an obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a prominent person. Although it tends to focus on positive aspects of the subject’s life this is not always the case. According to Nigel Farndale, the Obituaries Editor of The Times: “Obits should be life affirming rather than gloomy, but they should also be opinionated, leaving the reader with a strong sense of whether the subject lived a good life or bad; whether they were right or wrong in the handling of their public affairs.”

In local newspapers, an obituary may be published for any local resident upon death. A necrology is a register or list of records of the deaths of people related to a particular organization, group or field, which may only contain the sparsest details, or small obituaries. Historical necrologies can be important sources of information.