Death – Edwin Madison Taylor III Obituary

Death – Obituary

Edwin Madison Taylor III, 62, of Burlington died Thursday, Jan. 6, at Duke University Hospital in Durham. A native of Danbury, Madison was the son of Edwin Madison Taylor Jr. and Barbara Tuttle Taylor.

He is preceded in death by his father, Edwin Madison Taylor Jr.

Madison is survived by wife Roselee Papandrea Taylor of Burlington; mother Barbara Tuttle Taylor of Danbury; brother Spotswood Taylor of Walnut Cove; sister-in-law Annmarie (Ross) Gould of Newport; brother-in-law Vinnie (Tanya) Papandrea of Pittsboro; brother-in-law Michael Papandrea of New York; his beloved nephews and nieces, Jeff Schaeffer, Ross Gould, Megan Papandrea, Melanie (Mike) Czarnick, Michelle Papandrea, Ariel Gould, Joseph Papandrea, Joe Papandrea and Vinnie Papandrea; his aunt, Mary Moon (Tom) Guerrant of Charlotte; many loving cousins; a slew of special friends; and a cat named Typo.

The former executive editor of the Burlington Times-News, Madison spent 34 years in the newspaper business ensuring the free exchange of accurate and fair information. Above all else, he was an honest journalist who believed in the public’s right to know the truth, but he always remained cognizant of minimizing harm whenever possible ¬– ethics he instilled in the many reporters and editors who worked alongside him. He worked at several newspapers during his career, including the Danbury Reporter, Reidsville Review, the Burlington Times-News (twice) and the Jacksonville Daily News, where among his many editor roles, he wrote sports, news, features, film and book criticism and columns. He and Roselee’s love blossomed at the Jacksonville Daily News and remained strong throughout the 24 years they were married. He spent the past five years working (also with Roselee) at Elon University as a development writer in University Advancement, telling the story of the powerful impact of philanthropy upon the university and its students, a role he took seriously and was proud to serve in.

Madison’s love of the St. Louis Cardinals started in childhood, and he was fortunate to watch them play at various stadiums. Although it was a love-hate relationship, he begrudgingly cheered for Wake Forest basketball and football and was a fan of the Green Bay Packers.

He was an avid reader, lover of craft beer and Burlington Beer Works, and supporter of his community. He attended Guilford College for two years and then graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a degree in communications, specializing in TV/film production. He was witty and polite, rarely forgot a name and enjoyed crafting posts for his blog, Madison’s Avenue, https://mtaylor.blog/. One of his greatest joys was the opportunity to sell Christmas trees for many years in Swansboro with his late father-in-law, Joseph Papandrea.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date, ensuring the safety of his family and friends due to the current rise in COVID-19 cases.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Elon Student Scholarships program or the Center for Access and Success, https://www.elon.edu/u/advancement/ways-to-give/make-a-gift/ initiatives that meant a great deal to Madison.

Posted online on January 09, 2022

Published in Burlington Times News

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What Is An Obituary

In national newspapers an obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a prominent person. Although it tends to focus on positive aspects of the subject’s life this is not always the case. According to Nigel Farndale, the Obituaries Editor of The Times: “Obits should be life affirming rather than gloomy, but they should also be opinionated, leaving the reader with a strong sense of whether the subject lived a good life or bad; whether they were right or wrong in the handling of their public affairs.”

In local newspapers, an obituary may be published for any local resident upon death. A necrology is a register or list of records of the deaths of people related to a particular organization, group or field, which may only contain the sparsest details, or small obituaries. Historical necrologies can be important sources of information.